PleaseTech blog

We aim to provide useful, pertinent and sometimes fun insights into the world of document collaboration and the workings of a technology company

Document review, Labradors, webinars and cartoons...

Posted by Sarah Edmonds on 3. March 2015 11:02

The other half of marketing... Google


Hopefully somebody’s reading this blog as it forms part of our marketing communications strategy. This strategy is based on a wide variety of activities such as insightful content management, analyst relations, exhibition presence, speaking opportunities, whitepapers, webinars, partner activity, our cartoon website, social media as well as a variety of literature, and of course our website.  But amongst all this, what is the most effective method for really engaging with our customers and prospects and for getting a conversation started?

There is absolute value in producing whitepapers and conducting webinars, which can be viewed and listened to again on our SlideShare page.  The proof is in the pudding as hundreds of people visit this page. Not all visits turn into leads, but some do.  It also positions us as an authority and a market expert in the field of document review and co-authoring. This is broadly considered as ‘thought leadership’.

The same can be said for our YouTube page, here people can find the short animated films we’ve created which detail and demo the product, PleaseReview, and why you might need it.  We know that reading presentations and whitepapers can be a little dry at times and, as you can tell from our cartoons, we are anything but ‘dry’. So we often animate the results of any research we’ve conducted.  It humanizes our communications and projects our company’s personality. What we do is deadly serious but communicating it needn’t be dry. After all, our customers and prospective customers aren’t machines; they’re normal folk who absorb information in a range of ways from watching TV to reading a paper.

And these normal folk don’t want to spend their days solely thinking and looking at work related subjects, even when at work checking out their LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook streams – we all do it… Sometimes we just want a bit of light hearted fun, something that doesn’t tax the brain, something that makes us laugh.  So, for example, we took a look at our database and segmented job titles against names to establish the most popular names amongst various job positions, such as medical writers (Heather by the way).  And people loved it - they liked it, commented on and retweeted it.  And the response to our online quiz which allows people to find out what sort of document review personality they are (Labrador, squirrel, lion or dolphin) has gone through the roof.  

Hopefully whilst they’re on our website having a bit of fun, curiosity has got the better of them and they’ve had a little look around the site.  And maybe, just maybe they found something else they quite liked…

 

The power of partner webinars: working with Veeva and Generis broadens PleaseTech’s reach.

Posted by Sarah Holden on 3. December 2014 11:14

Half of the PleaseTech marketing team.


Over the last couple of weeks we have held two webinars. I have to say, a well-executed webinar that brings useful information to a specific audience is hard to beat in terms of generating real interest and giving the sales folk plenty to do.

In each instance, we worked with a partner. Not only does this give us compelling content to share, but our brand/product story reaches a new audience. In fact, these last webinars have given our sales people as many, if not more, follow up leads than some of the events we pay big bucks to attend.

Firstly we were presenting our PleaseReview integration with Veeva Vault. Veeva provides life sciences organizations with cloud based solutions for regulated content management. The integration of Veeva Vault with PleaseReview provides a complete and seamless process for document collaboration: 

 

The webinar elicited a large audience of existing Veeva customers looking to enhance their current process and interested parties looking for a complete solution. The volume of questions during the event was proof that having experts on hand and a live demonstration of the software was a far more effective means of generating interest than other, more traditional, methods of communication.

To view a recording of the webinar, please do visit Veeva’s website

 

Our second partner webinar was held in partnership with Generis, the creators of CARA - a fast, configurable user interface and business rules engine for the creation, approval and management of documents for leading content management platforms. The integration between CARA and PleaseReview is initially for Documentum users only and is one of the two contenders in the replacement of Documentum’s Webtop. As such, it is also geared towards providing an end to end document lifecycle solution for life sciences companies. 

In this instance, the webinar was marketed to existing CARA customers and counted both multi-national pharmaceuticals and emerging biotechs amongst the audience.

A more widely targeted webinar is expected in the New Year. However, to learn more about the integration, you can view the webinar recording here

   

Every little thing they do is magic

Posted by Sarah Edmonds on 14. August 2014 09:51

The other half of marketing... Google


It’s our job in our marketing to translate the magic.  Over in techie heaven (as they’re fondly known in PleaseTech), once the team have delivered the latest product release, it’s up to us to communicate the upgrades to the end user.  Sometimes it’s a tough gig, sitting in a meeting trying to understand what they mean when they talk about database transactions, continuous integration, encoding or regular expression… However, those are just some of the tools that have been used to design PleaseReview v5.1, but what do they mean and how do they benefit our customers?

A database transaction makes sure everything or nothing happens in a transaction.  So, if you spend $100 on groceries, a database transaction makes sure the money is both debited from your account and credited to the store’s account.  When thinking about PleaseReview it keeps the integrity of the data in sync, so if you and e.g. Tim are both online at the same time reviewing a proposal, and Tim then makes and immediately withdraws a comment, you aren’t able to reply to the comment.  Sounds obvious, but if you could reply to a comment you’d briefly seen, that had then been withdrawn there could be lots of random responses applied to a document.

Continuous integration does what it says on the tin.  It’s a development technique which continuously merges to our development servers the work developers individually do on new roll outs and integrations.  Its main aim is to prevent integration problems and to avoid one developer's work in progress breaking another developer's efforts, thus allowing our teams in the UK and Malaysia to work more effectively together.  For our customers, it means a higher quality product with fewer bugs.  So for example, PleaseReview v5.1 provides ‘post review reporting’, which delivers metrics around a review such as ‘how many proposed or rejected changes were there?’  This ‘review data’ is delivered via an Excel spreadsheet. Another 5.1 enhancement called “sub-reviews” allows a reviewer on one review to branch off their own sub-review with their own set of reviewers and then merge consolidated comments back into the original “master” review. These things were being developed by different teams at the same time but, rather than only bringing them together when they are both complete, the process of continuous integration means that every day we can test the latest sub-review code with the latest post-review reporting code to make sure they work properly together.

Character encoding represents a repertoire of characters , which is used in both computation, data storage, and the transmission of textual data At PleaseTech we use a universal coding (UTF-8) that handles letters from all alphabets.  Lots of our customers require documents to be reviewed not only by many people internal to an organisation, but also people externally who may work in different countries.  Encoding means that as a document passes between computers in different countries whose first languages may be different (French, Spanish etc.), the document doesn’t become corrupted.

What regular expression means to me, and what it means to our developers are two different things… To our techies, regular expression is a sequence of characters that forms a (potentially complex) search pattern.  This supports the new context-based review feature of PleaseReview v5.1, which allows reviewers to search for a word or phrase within a document to ensure that e.g. lower or upper case is being used correctly, or that a word or phrase is being used in its correct context.

Of course, there are lots other new benefits that can be found within PleaseReview v5.1, which is rolling out as we speak, and was talked about by Dave earlier in the year right here on this blog.  To find out more or to experience a little bit of the magic for yourself, please get in touch.  

What's your problem?

Posted by Sarah Edmonds on 18. June 2014 09:56

The other half of marketing... Google


What’s your problem?  No really, we want to know.  What are the problems you’re experiencing with your document review process?  Do you have a higher number of documents to review, how are you reviewing those documents, is the process working well for you?

It’s these sort of questions we’ve been asking prospective customers at the shows we’ve been attending this year.  At PleaseTech marketing HQ, it not only helps us get our messaging right, it also educates us so we can fully understand the inefficiencies of other review options (PDF, track changes with email, SharePoint, etc.) and why they don’t provide a completely effective review process.

Our latest research was gathered at the APMP Bid & Proposal Conference in Chicago in May of this year and highlighted something we’ve suspected for some time; that the document workload is increasing.   For proposal professionals, this means the number of documents they have to review is getting bigger and bigger.

Fine if the size of your team is increasing in proportion to the number of documents.   Or if you have a process in place to effectively manage the number of reviews coming across your desk, but our research suggests this isn’t the case.

Lots of color team reviewers don’t have simultaneous access to documents, nor can they review whenever, wherever and on any device.  Frustratingly, this means they’re sat at their desk waiting for a colleague to finish working on a document before they can begin. 

Many also say they’d like to know which of their changes do or don’t make the final draft, and associated rationale.

From the perspective of managing a review, document owners still have to merge several sets of changes into a master copy; they aren’t using a system which allows them to automatically incorporate all changes in one go. 

Often reviews are delayed when people forget about deadlines, and people tell us that a system that sent out reminders would be seriously helpful.  On the flip side, using a system that also showed each of the reviewers’ status on a review is also highlighted as being extremely useful by respondents. 

We know from past research conducted at SharePoint conferences that people are using legacy tools to review documents and this is the same for proposal professionals – tools of the trade include PDF mark-up, track changes with email or shared drives, and even hard copy. 

This amounts to proposals that miss deadlines; take far longer than necessary to complete; cost valuable work hours and causes inevitable disharmony amongst reviewers.

Every year, lots of new users come on board and start using PleaseReview.  Some of them from our existing customer base who see their colleagues using our software and want a slice of the cake, others new customers who come to us via our website, or who we meet at shows.  What they all have in common was a poor document review process, and the knowledge that there is a better way.  As for the rest of you, hopefully our research will begin to help you understand and improve your own processes.  We look forward to discussing it with you at one of the next shows we’re attending.

 

PleaseTech and Generis form strategic partnership to integrate PleaseReview with CARA for life science organizations

Posted by Sarah Edmonds on 20. May 2014 15:47

The other half of marketing... Google


Following a strategic partnership with Generis Knowledge Management, PleaseTech is undertaking a project to integrate PleaseReview with the CARA user interface. This will be of particular interest to life science organizations which already use a content management platform - typically Documentum although there will be other supported ECMs. 

For those who aren’t aware, CARA is a configurable user interface and business rules engine that facilitates the creation, review, approval and management of documents and connects with various document repositories. CMSWire recently called CARA a ‘pretty slick tool’. Specifically, with the deprecation of EMC Documentum’s Webtop interface, CARA is being used as a replacement by many organizations.

This latest integration will provide life sciences organizations and other CARA users with a market leading document review and co-authoring process seamlessly integrated within their CARA interface.

Initially, we’ll be supporting CARA with the EMC Documentum platform. Other platforms will follow.

What this means for Generis’ customers is that they’ll be able to leverage the power and functionality of PleaseReview’s document review and co-authoring tools through CARA on their Content Management Systems.

So, as we start the long, slow farewell to Documentum’s WebTop, we hope this strategic partnership is just the beginning for CARA and PleaseReview.

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